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How to Make a Water Haul Cast

Welcome to another installment of “Ask an Orvis Fly-Fishing Instructor,” with me, Peter Kutzer. In this episode, I demonstrate how to make a water haul, which uses the water tension and the force of the current on your line to load the rod. By loading the rod this way, you can make a quick, accurate upstream presentation without false-casting at all. This is great for two reasons: first, it gets your flies back in the water faster; but perhaps more importantly, it means you can cast complex rigs (two flies, plus an indicator and split shot, for example) without fear of tangling. There are a couple things to keep in mind when you’re making a water haul. You need to break the surface tension of the water by lifting the rod slowly at first. Otherwise, you might make the line snap off the water, creating an unholy mess. Once you’ve got the line moving, rotate your hand, so your thumb is on the top of the grip. The thumb is how you’ll aim the cast. When you’re lined up with your target, accelerate to a stop as you normally would. Practice this a few times, and you’ll see how useful the water haul can be in many angling situations. Good luck!

Video: How to Make a Water Haul Cast

Welcome to another installment of “Ask an Orvis Fly-Fishing Instructor,” with me, Peter Kutzer. In this episode, I demonstrate how to make a water haul, which uses the water tension and the force of the current on your line to load the rod. By loading the rod this way, you can make a quick, accurate upstream presentation without false-casting at all. This is great for two reasons: first, it gets your flies back in the water faster; but perhaps more importantly, it means you can cast complex rigs (two flies, plus an indicator and split shot, for example) without fear of tangling. There are a couple things to keep in mind when you’re making a water haul. You need to break the surface tension of the water by lifting the rod slowly at first. Otherwise, you might make the line snap off the water, creating an unholy mess. Once you’ve got the line moving, rotate your hand, so your thumb is on the top of the grip. The thumb is how you’ll aim the cast. When you’re lined up with your target, accelerate to a stop as you normally would. Practice this a few times, and you’ll see how useful the water haul can be in many angling situations. Good luck! Welcome to another installment of “Ask an Orvis Fly-Fishing Instructor,” with me, Peter Kutzer. In this episode, I demonstrate how to make a water haul, which uses the water tension and the force of the current on your line to load the rod. By loading the rod this way, you can make a quick, accurate upstream presentation without false-casting at all. This is great for two reasons: first, it gets your flies back in the water faster; but perhaps more importantly, it means you can cast complex rigs (two flies, plus an indicator and split shot, for example) without fear of tangling. There are a couple things to keep in mind when you’re making a water haul. You need to break the surface tension of the water by lifting the rod slowly at first. Otherwise, you might make the line snap off the water, creating an unholy mess. Once you’ve got the line moving, rotate your hand, so your thumb is on the top of the grip. The thumb is how you’ll aim the cast. When you’re lined up with your target, accelerate to a stop as you normally would. Practice this a few times, and you’ll see how useful the water haul can be in many angling situations. Good luck!

13 thoughts on “How to Make a Water Haul Cast”

  1. Improving my fundamentals and appreciate these videos! Keep them coming and please consider a girl new to the sport for the Helios rod!

  2. As a rank beginner, just had another one of those “D’oh! How did I never know to do that? ” moments. Thanks again for the insight Pete.

  3. As always Peter’s demonstrations are easy to follow and informative. I shall be slowing down my lift off from now on.

  4. I use this with heavy nymph rigs in fast or deep water. A “water haul” sounds so much more refined than a “dump cast” or “chuck and duck.” Excellent video. How about one that shows ways to alter presentation with a bow and arrow or slingshot cast?

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