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How to Tie the Sparrow

Tim Flagler of Tightline Productions, offers his version of Jack Gartside’s venerable pattern in this great video. Flagler uses Chickabou and soft-hackle feathers in place of Gartside’s pheasant, creating a fly that retains the silhouette and versatility of the original, but with perhaps a bit more action and flash in the water. As usual, there are also some useful tying tips in Flagler’s lesson, such as wetting a feather to make it easier to work with and how to blend dubbing.

Video: How to Tie the Sparrow

Famed fly-tier, angler, and cab-driver Jack Gartside wrote that he came up with the Sparrow pattern out of sheer laziness, while camping on the Madison river in the 1980s: "Being a lazy fisherman, I hated changing flies any more than was absolutely necessary and wanted a fly that I could fish as a nymph or as a streamer or even as a passable hopper imitation (greased to float, sunken as a drowned grasshopper). So I was looking to come up with an impressionistic fly that would combine some of the common features of both insect and baitfish, a fly that could look (depending on how it was fished and its overall size) like lots of things in general and nothing in particular. I would let the fish make up its own mind as to what it was." Tim Flagler of Tightline Productions, offers his own version of Gartside’s venerable pattern in this great video. Flagler uses Chickabou and soft-hackle feathers in place of Gartside’s pheasant, creating a fly that retains the silhouette and versatility of the original, but with perhaps a bit more action and flash in the water. As usual, there are also some useful tying tips in Flagler’s lesson, such as wetting a feather to make it easier to work with and how to blend dubbing. Tim Flagler of Tightline Productions, offers his version of Jack Gartside’s venerable pattern in this great video. Flagler uses Chickabou and soft-hackle feathers in place of Gartside’s pheasant, creating a fly that retains the silhouette and versatility of the original, but with perhaps a bit more action and flash in the water. As usual, there are also some useful tying tips in Flagler’s lesson, such as wetting a feather to make it easier to work with and how to blend dubbing.

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