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How to Tie the Devil Bug

The Devil Bug (known by more devout folk as the “Doodle Bug”) was originally designed by Orley C. Tuttle in the second decade of the 1900s as a beetle imitation, with which he caught smallmouth bass on his home lake in the Adirondacks of upstate New York. By the 1920s, Tuttle was selling an astonishing 50,000 bugs per year, in a variety of colors and sizes—a testament to the pattern’s ability to fool almost any fish that swims. In this great video from Tightline Productions, Tim Flagler walks you through the steps to tie a Devil Bug. He also describes several ways to fish it, although he left out one of my favorites: stripping the fly underwater at the end of a long drift.

Video: How to Tie the Devil Bug

The Devil Bug (known by more devout folk as the “Doodle Bug”) was originally designed by Orley C. Tuttle in the second decade of the 1900s as a beetle imitation, with which he caught smallmouth bass on his home lake in the Adirondacks of upstate New York. By the 1920s, Tuttle was selling an astonishing 50,000 bugs per year, in a variety of colors and sizes—a testament to the pattern’s ability to fool almost any fish that swims. In this great video from Tightline Productions, Tim Flagler walks you through the steps to tie a Devil Bug. He also describes several ways to fish it, although he left out one of my favorites: stripping the fly underwater at the end of a long drift. The Devil Bug (known by more devout folk as the “Doodle Bug”) was originally designed by Orley C. Tuttle in the second decade of the 1900s as a beetle imitation, with which he caught smallmouth bass on his home lake in the Adirondacks of upstate New York. By the 1920s, Tuttle was selling an astonishing 50,000 bugs per year, in a variety of colors and sizes—a testament to the pattern’s ability to fool almost any fish that swims. In this great video from Tightline Productions, Tim Flagler walks you through the steps to tie a Devil Bug. He also describes several ways to fish it, although he left out one of my favorites: stripping the fly underwater at the end of a long drift.

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