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How to Tie the Cloud Emerger

This mayfly-emerger pattern features the same “rabbit twist” of rabbit fur and peacock herl used on Matt’s Gnat to create an extremely buggy, suggestive fly. The “tent wingcase” created by pinching a single segment of goose feather is a great way to suggest that the emerger is ready to hatch. In this great video author and blogger Matt Grobert offers several great tying tricks, such as tying in the goose segment on the side of the hook and allowing the thread torque to move it to the top, as well as using upward thread pressure to lock the feather segment down without crushing it. The focus and clarity of these videos is remarkable, and I encourage you to watch them in HD at full screen to get the most our of them.

Video: How to Tie the Cloud Emerger

This mayfly-emerger pattern features the same “rabbit twist” of rabbit fur and peacock herl used on Matt’s Gnat to create an extremely buggy, suggestive fly. The “tent wingcase” created by pinching a single segment of goose feather is a great way to suggest that the emerger is ready to hatch. In this great video author and blogger Matt Grobert offers several great tying tricks, such as tying in the goose segment on the side of the hook and allowing the thread torque to move it to the top, as well as using upward thread pressure to lock the feather segment down without crushing it. The focus and clarity of these videos is remarkable, and I encourage you to watch them in HD at full screen to get the most our of them. This mayfly-emerger pattern features the same “rabbit twist” of rabbit fur and peacock herl used on Matt’s Gnat to create an extremely buggy, suggestive fly. The “tent wingcase” created by pinching a single segment of goose feather is a great way to suggest that the emerger is ready to hatch. In this great video author and blogger Matt Grobert offers several great tying tricks, such as tying in the goose segment on the side of the hook and allowing the thread torque to move it to the top, as well as using upward thread pressure to lock the feather segment down without crushing it. The focus and clarity of these videos is remarkable, and I encourage you to watch them in HD at full screen to get the most our of them.

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